WHO'S RESPONSIBLE GUIDE

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2019/2020          Annual Report

Dealing with property damage? Here’s who’s responsible

On 1 July 1961 the first strata title legislation was introduced into NSW. Over those past 50 years strata in Australia has emerged as a strong industry which has as its very heart the needs and concerns of consumers.

The initial strata legislation from its very humble 1961 beginnings has done us proud and has even been exported to Singapore and Dubai as a model from which those countries can administer their own schemes.

On 5 November 1980 a group of strata managers got together and formed the first association representing strata managers which became the Institute of Strata Title Management (ISTM). For many years the organisation provided social and networking events and eventually gained accreditation as a Registered Training Organisation (RTO) enabling it to offer it’s own strata-related training courses including the Certificate of Registration course and CPD.

Today we have an industry that has grown to the point that change was necessarily on the horizon and on 1 July 2013 ISTM rebranded as Strata Community Australia (NSW) and in 2018 as Strata Community Association (NSW) and has become part of an organisation whose aim is to have a bigger presence and a bigger say in strata and community title industry at both a state and national level.

A huge amount of work has gone into compiling the information and updating the guide to ensure that all readers receive the most up to date suggestions and recommendations for addressing property damage and liability in strata. 

First launched in 2010, the “Who’s responsible: a guide to common property” guide is available for download.

It’s had a few updates along the way and provides a comprehensive list of items found within a building that could generally be considered common property. It aims to give some guidance on who usually would be responsible for giving that item attention.

The guide is not meant to be a definitive answer to some of the more complex questions, although it can be used as a start.

SCA (NSW) recommends that in more complex cases, the guide should be used in conjunction with the strata plan and by-laws to determine who is responsible for repairs and maintenance.